Intro and a Question

Intro and a Question
« on: July 11, 2016, 03:50:38 pm »
I've been reading through a number of the posts, and while I have by no means exhausted the forums, there is one matter I have not seen addressed and would like to solicit feedback.  I've had gynecomastia ever since I was a boy.  Over the past couple years, I've dropped 70# and, as you would expect, my breasts have sagged noticeably. While I'm not that big (44 between and A & B cup according to a fitter), one breast sags below the other to a degree that is all too obvious to me.  With this assymmetry, I decided to start wearing a bra.  My question is for the guys out there that are smaller breasted:  Has the lack of symmetry been at least part of the reason you started wearing a bra?
I do want to thank the member that recommended the Leading Lady 5028 as this is the best bra I have tried so far.  I have several of the Coobie bras which are quite comfortable, but I need to use the pads to hide the lopsidedness and they add quite a bit of volume and also are warmer due to the additional coverage.  I am retired and living in the tropics, so vests and compression shirts would be too warm to be comfortable.  I'm usually in a T or golf shirt all day, so I am looking for bras that don't "print" readily.
At the risk of an excessively long post, I also wanted to mention compression tights to one of the forum's gentlemen that needs medical-grade compression hosiery.  I also have venous insufficiency, and I have found that the more expensive compression tights to be more comfortable than the support hosiery I have worn.  They also help a bit with the creaky knees and hips and also with the recovery from exercising (walking the dogs and mini-trampoline).  The Skins A400 tights have the best compression I have found so far.  While the tights are warm, they are tolerable and when the air is moving (breeze or fan), quite comfortable.  In a strong breeze, they can actually feel quite cool.

Linkback: https://www.gynecomastia.org/smf/index.php?topic=31892.0

Offline hammer

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Re: Intro and a Question
« Reply #1 on: July 11, 2016, 05:13:59 pm »
As for bras I'm a 46H so I'm limited to what I can find that fit and work  for me.

As for the compression hose, I get mine from the VA and they are thigh high jobs 2030 compression hose black. I've found that even in the 90 plus temps they're not that bad, but my legs feel tons better with them on then off so I'll put up with the heat.
I'd rather be hated for who I am, then loved for who I'm not!

I am who I am,  and I'm not going to change to please anyone!

Re: Intro and a Question
« Reply #2 on: July 11, 2016, 06:03:11 pm »
I'm not quite as big as hammer, but I do wear a 36G in most of my bras. I don't go braless often. You'll get your best support and shape from an underwire. 

Re: Intro and a Question
« Reply #3 on: July 11, 2016, 08:40:53 pm »
I was kind of surprised by the limited options out there in 44As.  I'm planning to continue with the weight loss program and hope to get into a 42B in a few months.  Lots more options there.
My logic was to check out underwire bras as I felt they would give more support to even out the droopier side which seems to be the case.  The LL 5028 is an underwire and seems to work well.  I have one on today and have been quite active - 1/2 hour walk with the dogs in the mountains, change the oil in the wife's car, started to change the front disc pads, but found that the auto parts store had given me rear pads.  The bra is pretty sweat soaked at the moment but still working and quite comfortable.  I'm going to hit the trampoline in a few minutes and give it another workout.
If you can get someone to pay for your compression hosiery and find it comfortable, by all means stay with that.  I'm fortunate that I didn't get too bunged up in the military and have to pay my own way.  And Mr. Hammer, please accept my appreciation for your service to the U.S.  I am somewhat amazed by how much the compression legwear helps, whatever form it takes.

Offline hammer

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Re: Intro and a Question
« Reply #4 on: July 11, 2016, 11:15:00 pm »
Thanks!

I'm assuming that you already went for a formal fitting as I believe that you said that in your 1st post, if not it's the only way to go.

I first needed to wear compression hose for edema, but between those and a craftmatic bed I over came the worse of that, but I do get swelling if I don't wear the hose, or get the feet up because I can't walk much, I use a wheelchair. I was wishing I could do all walking you talked about in your post, lol! I got the (I want to) but the pain makes it impossible, however, things like the compression do make it better! It stops the prosthetic knees from sounding like maracas as I walk because they rattle like nuts and bolts! I've been told that it's normal for some knee replacements to do that, but the hose fix the problem too, as that doesn't feel good!

It's like the bra stops the extra breast tissue, fat and skin stop dancing, jumping and bouncing when I do walk and it helps prevent the red rash under the fold!

We always say a bra is a garment to support breast and my wife said the other day, if your a guy with breast and wear a bra, your not cross dressing, as you need a bra to support breast, however, if you have no breast and wear a bra, then you are a cross dresser!

Bob

Re: Intro and a Question
« Reply #5 on: July 12, 2016, 02:41:46 am »
Yes, I had a formal fitting last month while we were back in the US for a visit and the usual medical exams.  
I used to have bouts of edema and some neuropathy, but the walking seems to have taken care of the majority of both those symptoms.  I think that the compression tights provide an extra measure of protection against those symptoms returning, but the help they give to the knees, hips, and soft tissue is worth the price alone to me.
It's true - a little compression and a little support do a(n aging) body a lot of good and blunt some of the less desirable consequences we have to live with.
If you are willing, I would be interested in hearing how your wife feels about a guy that does not have large breasts, but the ones he has are uneven.  I've only talked to two women about wearing a bra (one is my wife) and it's a split decision whether or not unevenness warrants a bra, especially in a warm climate.

Offline hammer

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Re: Intro and a Question
« Reply #6 on: July 12, 2016, 11:15:41 am »
I have very severe neuropathy, the painful kind, not the "I lost all my feelings" kind, and you know I believe the hose has helped that too, go figure, I can't stand a light bump but the pressure is good!

Debbie, bought me my 1st bra when I was between a A and B cup (I was that size from my teen years), and she is very small herself, so it wouldn't matter how big or small or if your the same size on each side, if you need support, you need it, as far as she's concerned! I can also tell you that both of my daughter's would agree as well! Debbie and the girls encouraged me to go for the formal fitting long before I did! They are 26 and 24. So now you have 3 other females thoughts on it as well!

We have guys that come on the forum that are as flat as the oak boards I used to make cabinets out of asking "how bad their gyno was"!  Or the ones with what we would call "nipple hard on" back in our day looking to have surgery that make us shake our heads.

Re: Intro and a Question
« Reply #7 on: July 12, 2016, 02:17:45 pm »
My neuropathy was pin pricks all over at unpredictable times.  It never got so severe that it went beyond a major annoyance or cost me much sleep, but I am glad that it's largely a thing of the past.  I've got two friends in our community here that take Lyrica for neuropathy.  Between there anecdotes, the effects of the stuff when they write e-mails, and the TV ads for the stuff, it seems like things would have to progress to a pretty bad place to want to take it.  My sympathies and prayers.
Thanks to your ladies for adding to the "pro" side of my poll.  You can't beat the voice of experience.  All the self-styled "experts" out there that have never walked a mile in your moccasins can drive me to distraction. 
I had a buddy like the type you mentioned.  Former Marine, personal trainer, and just in super shape.  Last time I saw him he was looking into liposuction to get rid of his "love handles" that we undetectable to me and certainly not in the same league as mine!

TooMuchBoob

Re: Intro and a Question
« Reply #8 on: July 13, 2016, 12:44:21 pm »
kbill2 and hammer,

I assume it's ok to discuss things other than gynecomastia related issues since you both have.

How can compression hosiery be comfortable during warm weather when it adds another heavy layer? I will probably need them in the next few years and I am very worried about summer (which, apparently, makes any leg problems worse).

One of you mentioned airflow or breeze helping, but how does that work if they are under work pants or sweats (at home)? I have had a chance to feel the material on a pair of Jobst(?) and it seems very thick and heavy.

TMB

Offline hammer

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Re: Intro and a Question
« Reply #9 on: July 13, 2016, 04:05:44 pm »
Well, as stated in other post, TMB (bummed) the benefits outweigh any discomfort if any! I've been wearing compression hose off and on for over 20 years and I would say that either I've changed or the technology change as they are cooler or seem cooler then they did 20 years,ago! I just started wearing Jobs brand when switch my medical to the VA and I do like them better then the other kind I used to get.

It's about 85 right now which isn't that bad, but the humidity is high and I was mowing the lawn on a rider, got that done, cut up an old car top carrier to put in the garage to go out tonight for tomorrow's pickup. I was wearing an old worn out pair of thin sweat pants over my compression hose, and a tee shirt and a bra. I came in sweaty from the work, took off the sweat pants, tee shirt and bra but left the compression hose on. Why, I was only hot from my groin up! I took a sink bath for now, (bath or shower is very hard with my disabilities) put on dry clothing and am resting! In many ways I'd rather have my compression hose on then my bra, because they give me much more comfort overall then my bra!

Re: Intro and a Question
« Reply #10 on: July 13, 2016, 04:28:03 pm »
There have been a number of advances in fiber technology.  I'm no expert, but I do know that a number of the "microfibers" wick sweat away from the skin so that you don't notice the affects of perspiration as one would with cotton.  I'm typically in tights, a bra and shirt for my walks during which time I will sweat quite a bit and the tights never feel soggy as my shirt does.  I think that wearing hosiery under pants will feel warmer, but the wicking and transfer of the perspiration to the outer garment will make the compression hosiery tolerable.  It's probably best to try if for yourself where you are as local temperature, humidity, and your clothing and movement will have a lot to do with your perception of comfort.

Offline hammer

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Re: Intro and a Question
« Reply #11 on: July 13, 2016, 05:20:09 pm »
The only reason that I had old sweat pants on was to protect the compression hose while mowing and working in the garage! I usually just wear shorts with the hose, as I don't care what others think!

Re: Intro and a Question
« Reply #12 on: July 15, 2016, 01:56:17 am »
I have developed a stronger sense of that same mind set as I've been going through the process of learning about gynecomastia and wearing a bra.  Ditto for wearing tights while I'm out walking.  I'm sure part of it is the advancing years, but part of it is that bras and tights prevent various ills and pains which is more important to me than someone's opinion that has no understanding of my particular condition.  Any item of clothing that helps me get through the day with fewer aches, pains, and tiredness trumps all the negative opinions out there.

Offline dbweb

Re: Intro and a Question
« Reply #13 on: July 19, 2016, 07:19:00 pm »
Wearing medical grade support hose is something I have done for much longer than I have had to wear a bra.(20-30 is what I have to wear as well)  At least 25years now for the hose.
I will add that the hose I use today is magnitudes better than what I started with.  How can it be comfortable in hot sweaty conditions you ask.   Seems it does wick moisture away from your skin so much easier to wear than it appears. It also stays up now, something that was a problem early on.  Even tried the garters,  what a disaster in the building construction business.
I have no choice, as even after vein surgery ~8 years  ago which was intended to get me away from these, I managed to get blood clots in my legs when not wearing so my surgeon told me to just get over it, wear the hose daily  and I have.  I don't feel dressed without my hose on now, and my legs certainly are much better after wearing the hose daily, and most important, no more blood clots!

While I am still fairly new to use of bras at ~3years, I have accepted need for these as well, really what this forum is all about. 

TooMuchBoob

Re: Intro and a Question
« Reply #14 on: July 20, 2016, 12:14:40 pm »
Wearing medical grade support hose is something I have done for much longer than I have had to wear a bra.(20-30 is what I have to wear as well)  At least 25years now for the hose.
I will add that the hose I use today is magnitudes better than what I started with.  How can it be comfortable in hot sweaty conditions you ask.   Seems it does wick moisture away from your skin so much easier to wear than it appears. It also stays up now, something that was a problem early on.  Even tried the garters,  what a disaster in the building construction business.
I have no choice, as even after vein surgery ~8 years  ago which was intended to get me away from these, I managed to get blood clots in my legs when not wearing so my surgeon told me to just get over it, wear the hose daily  and I have.  I don't feel dressed without my hose on now, and my legs certainly are much better after wearing the hose daily, and most important, no more blood clots!


I personally cannot see how compression pantyhose can be tolerable (let alone comfortable) when heat indexes are over 100F.

Yesterday the index was 109F and I had a 2 hour drive (1 hour into the sun) in a car without air conditioning. My clothes felt like they just got out of a washing machine by the time I got home - and that's without wearing another heavy layer. I wear steel toe leather work boots and walk a lot, so I need to wear decently thick socks. Adding compression hosiery will make 3 thick layers just on my feet.

My issue is not with the hose, but with the insurance company. Compression hosiery is NOT a cure, it's a bandaid - and an expensive one (over $100 per pair). Surgery is a cure if it works and that's what should be tried first. If surgery fails as it did  in your case, then I would have to figure something out.

As it stands, they are giving me the choice between stasis eczema, leg ulcers, and future DVTs or heat stroke and fungal infections on my feet.

TMB


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