Introduction

Gynecomastia is derived from the Greek terms gynec (feminine) and mastos (breast). The literal translation, male breasts, relates to any condition that results in excessive development of breast tissue in males. Males may rarely develop breast cancer, but this is often associated with testicular atrophy.

Male breast volume is composed of a combination of ductal and stromal tissue, commonly referred to as glandular tissue, and an increase in adipocytes, typically referred to as fatty tissue. Excess skin resulting in significant ptosis of the breast may be present in patients with severe gynecomastia. See the images below.

   
Preoperative gynecomastia patient. Note the enlarged breast size. Post surgical correction of gynecomastia. Note the improved contour, which enables the patient to look better both in and out of clothes. Postoperative view of patient after surgical glandular excision and combined ultrasonic-assisted liposuction (UAL) and power-assisted liposuction (PAL). Preoperative gynecomastia patient. Courtesy of Miguel Delgado, MD.
       
   
Post surgical correction of gynecomastia. The patient underwent gland excision with liposuction. Courtesy of Miguel Delgado, MD. Preoperative gynocomastia patient. Courtesy of Miguel Delgado, MD. Post surgical correction of gynecomastia. Gland excision with liposuction. Note the large mole on the right chest that has flattened out. Courtesy of Miguel Delgado, MD. Preoperative gynecomastia patient. Courtesy of Miguel Delgado, MD.
       
      
Post surgical correction of gynecomastia. Gland excision with liposuction. Note how the skin contracts. Courtesy of Miguel Delgado, MD.      

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