Author Topic: My son... I pray that he escapes it.  (Read 9180 times)

Offline Mr_Nip

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My son is now almost 10.  I'm praying that he doesn't get gynecomastia.  I'm hoping he escapes this monster that attacks men in our most vulnerable areas - Our masculinity, self-image, confidence, athleticism, sexuality, and overall state-of-mind are all negatively impacted by it.  Our decision-making processes in many areas of life are guided by it in a negative way.  We become imprisoned by it in the open world.  We choose not to talk about it because of the pains we associate with people knowing.  We refuse to get help from our loved ones because of fears they won't understand... and many times they don't.  

I'm praying that my son doesn't get it because I don't want him to have even a small portion of the experiences I've had with it.  If, however, he does end up with gynecomastia because of genetics, then I will be there for him.  He'll go to the best endocrinologist.  If it takes it, he'll go to the best surgeon we can find.  He'll have my (and his mom's, and grandmother's) total and unfailing support.   He'll not have to deal with this problem by himself in silence like I, and so many others, have had to do.  

Parents, I can't put into words how important this is.

Please think hard about how you respond to your son's gynecomastia.  I promise you, your son will NEVER FORGET your words and your actions at this time... Never.



Linkback: https://www.gynecomastia.org/forum/index.php?topic=6567.0
MR. NIP

I come from nowhere
And you should go there.
Just try it for a while.
The people from nowhere always smile.  -  Frank Zappa

Offline jones357

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Quote
My son is now almost 10.  I'm praying that he doesn't get gynecomastia.  I'm hoping he escapes this monster that attacks men in our most vulnerable areas - Our masculinity, self-image, confidence, athleticism, sexuality, and overall state-of-mind are all negatively impacted by it.  Our decision-making processes in many areas of life are guided by it in a negative way.  We become imprisoned by it in the open world.  We choose not to talk about it because of the pains we associate with people knowing.  We refuse to get help from our loved ones because of fears they won't understand... and many times they don't.  

I'm praying that my son doesn't get it because I don't want him to have even a small portion of the experiences I've had with it.  If, however, he does end up with gynecomastia because of genetics, then I will be there for him.  He'll go to the best endocrinologist.  If it takes it, he'll go to the best surgeon we can find.  He'll have my (and his mom's, and grandmother's) total and unfailing support.   He'll not have to deal with this problem by himself in silence like I, and so many others, have had to do.  

Parents, I can't put into words how important this is.

Please think hard about how you respond to your son's gynecomastia.  I promise you, your son will NEVER FORGET your words and your actions at this time... Never.



There are more than  few guys on here that agree with you and wish they don't pass this crap on. My son is only 3 and leaner than I have ever been.  He is already starting to show signs of gyne.  I hope that when he gets older it is gone.  If not, I hope he will feel comfort in knowing that I went through it and got it corrected. I can't imagine what it would have been like to feel that I could talk to my parents about it. I want to make sure I addres it the right way with him.  

Good luck to your son.  we all know what is or will eventually go through his mind.

Offline headheldhigh01

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heredity might predispose but it will not at all guarantee the kid will suffer the same thing.   most cases are idiopathic (origin uncertain) and/or influenced by environmental factors. but the alertness and concern is a great thing.  
* a man is more than a body will ever tell
* if it screws up your life the same, is there really any such thing as "mild" gyne?

Offline tnel00son

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well, my dad never had it, so its not 100% that its passed thru genes, and as a result he gave me a hard time about paying for the surgery...im already 18 and he was telling me to wait a few more years, really ticked me off. luckily my mom understood and helped pay for it.

Offline Give me Life

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I think Gyne is generic pass. My dad has it. Even my brother has it but not that size what can concern him. Also, my mom's dad had it. So it's passing process I belive.

But, as we know the cure, if my son (2yr.) will have them, i will make them cure before even he reliase what he is lossing becasuse of Gyne.

I have not enjoyed my whole college life and my student life beacuse of Gyne. I would not have suffer my child.
Surgery done on Sept 6th, 2006 with Dr. Fielding - Toronto. Not 100% cured but will get there for sure !!!
----------------------------------------------------

Revision done on December 7th, 2007. Let's hope for best !!!
-------------------------------------------

Dr. Fielding
Suite #401, 2425 Bloor Street West, Toronto

Tel: 416.766.88

Offline heartbrokenmom

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I have two sons, one has it and one doesn't.  Their father and paternal grandfather doesn't have it.  My father and his father didn't have it.  I'm at a loss about this.  The only thing I can think of is that he had some medical problems and had to take lots of medicine.  Wonder if that could have contributed? (antibotics)  Also, a medicine that was deemed ok for constant ear infections  which he took as a toddler makes me wonder because it isn't a great medicine now?  (Bactrim)

I feel really bad for the son that has it because he also knows his brother doesn't.  Thats hard position to be in.
He has had issues in College, also.   I feel so bad about that.    Because this time is suppose to be the "best time of your life".
« Last Edit: September 17, 2006, 07:19:54 AM by heartbrokenmom »

Offline Mr_Nip

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I'm convinced that some strong medicines I had to take as a child contributed to my severe gynecomastia.  I have no regrets about that, though, because I believe I wouldn't be here today if I had not been given those medications.  I also had a grandfather who had a case of gyne so the genes could have played a part as well.  

I just had surgery and am now looking forward to knowing what it's like to go to a pool without everybody looking and snickering.   :)

It sounds like you've talked some with your son or you wouldn't know that he's had some college issues, but you can be sure he hasn't told you how bad it really is.  Some of the more hurtful comments that are made by the guys (and sometimes girls) are so bad they couldn't be told to a mom.  Believe me because I know from experience.  If it was bad with me in the 80's, you can only imagine how bad it must be for him in 2006 and beyond.  Your son, being college-aged, could benefit by surgery.  There are some prime years ahead of him that could be spent with or without gynecomastia, depending on the level of your support at this time.  Frankly, if my son had gynecomastia I would do without whatever it took (cars, computer, TV, steak dinners, etc.) to be able to prevent him from having to endure college with gyne the way I did.  

By the way, your son is lucky to have a mom who cares enough to search out advice here.  If you haven't done it yet, look at this video: http://individual.utoronto.ca/charlesh/documentary/gyn128k.html

Offline Paa_Paw

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The condition is almost universal among the men in my family but as everyone kept it hidden, I did not know it until I was well into my thirties. Until then, it seems we each thought we were the only ones and we suffered alone.

I was more open with my children and they grew up expecting to be just like their dad and uncles. As a result, They accepted the condition as a source of occasional embarassment and nothing more. The only one of my children (all now grown) to have breast reduction surgery was a daughter who had her breasts pared down to a D cup from an H.
Grandpa Dan

Offline Grandpa Bambu

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Quote
My son is now almost 10.  I'm praying that he doesn't get gynecomastia.  I'm hoping he escapes this monster that attacks men in our most vulnerable areas - Our masculinity, self-image, confidence, athleticism, sexuality, and overall state-of-mind are all negatively impacted by it.  Our decision-making processes in many areas of life are guided by it in a negative way.  We become imprisoned by it in the open world.  We choose not to talk about it because of the pains we associate with people knowing.  We refuse to get help from our loved ones because of fears they won't understand... and many times they don't.


Yup.... that pretty much sums it up.

Great post Mr_Nip.....

John.
Surgery: February 16, 2005. - Toronto, Ontario Canada.
Surgeon: Dr. John Craig Fielding   M.D.   F.R.C.S. (C) (416.766.8890)
Pre-Op/Post-Op Pics

Offline wolfman

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i have 3 boys in the age of 9, 7 ,and 5 and im so afraid that they will get it. hope there is a god who can make sure that my boys wont have to suffer like i have. :-[


BYE Henke
i finally feel like im a man

Offline desi

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look at the brighter side, GOD forbid, even if it hits them, at least u will know as a parent what needs to be done and provide better emotional support. they wont have to think of means and ways to approach u. as a parent, u will approach them first and make it easier for themm... :)
Formerly, 'Fattgayee', as in 'Torn Apart' or more so 'I am Screwed' :)

 

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