Author Topic: trt  (Read 981 times)

Offline clike

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trt
Hey guys.  I have posted in the past about this topic and was wondering if anyone had any new info or same experience as myself.  I have low testosterone and when I start treatment it causes fat on my chest even with my estrogen at low levels. thanks for any input

Linkback: https://www.gynecomastia.org/forum/index.php?topic=34123.0

Offline walt

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Hi I am on TRT and have breast growth from a small A cup to now almost a C cup, it happens as well with age and other factors like meds and pituitary problems and so on.

Offline clike

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Hi I am on TRT and have breast growth from a small A cup to now almost a C cup, it happens as well with age and other factors like meds and pituitary problems and so on.
sent you a pm

Offline gynepaul

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I first noticed some growth in my left breast in late July of this year at 65 years old.  I was subsequently diagnosed with severe testosterone deficiency (about 160) and started TRT in September. I’m using topical solution applied to my underarms daily. 

My testosterone levels soared to above 900 after starting TRT.  I’m feeling better and my ED problems have subsided somewhat. I noticed that the breast growth on the left side has slowed some since going on TRT.  But, growth on the right side has started, whereas there had been no previous growth on that side prior to TRT. 

My boobs are still small enough to hide under most any shirt I wear, but they are quite noticeable bare chested.  But, I’m still wondering where things will go from here. 

I really did think that going on TRT would put an end to the breast growth, but after reading Walt’s post (he grew to a C cup while on TRT) and seeing some continued growth in my case, I’m not so sure anymore that TRT will solve that problem. 

Due to the other benefits I’m seeing with TRT, I will continue to use it.  If I experience any additional breast growth, I think I will just have to accept that as part of the deal. At my age, there are a lot worse problems I could be facing. 

hammer

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I'm not sure how it all works,  but there are some guys that have been on the forum that have dug down deep into how all the hormones work together!

One of them has been edward79 and he got a good understanding I believe on how they work. I think if you get to much testosterone it can change or produce a change in how your body reacts to it and you can produce more estrogen or something like that! But I may be screwing this all up so don't take it to the bank.

Send edward79 a PM and ask him. Tell him that I said to ask, as I haven't seen him on the forum for awhile. I can also let him know as well.

Offline Dr. Elliot Jacobs

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    • Gynecomastia Surgery
The endocrine system is intricate and balanced in our bodies.  Some men have naturally low testosterone levels and still have reasonable sexual function.  Others will need some gentle boost in their testosterone levels.  Older men generally see a slow decline in their testosterone, which is why older men sometimes develop gynecomastia (the testosterone to estrogen levels have flipped).

Testosterone treatment is best done under  very careful observation and monitoring of an endocrinologist.  Some general practitioners may cavalierly prescribe testosterone (injection, patches, etc) and not fully understand all the side effects which may occur, such as diminishing one's one natural production of testosterone, possible aromatization (change) of testosterone to estrogen, which in turn will stimulate breast development, etc.

One should not simply treat a number (the normal levels of testosterone run from 250 - 1100) -- so anything in-between can be considered normal.

I would very strongly caution anyone considering testosterone supplementation to undertake it with an endocrinologist supervising the treatment rather than buying medication on the internet and relying on advice given by non-physicians on the internet.  Further, anyone taking testosterone should consider taking an estrogen blocker as well.

Dr Jacobs

Dr. Jacobs 
Certified: American Board of Plastic Surgery
Fellow: American College of Surgeons
Practice sub-specialty in Gynecomastia Surgery
815 Park Avenue
New York, New York 10021
Telephone:  (212) 570-6080
Email:  dr.j@elliotjacobsmd.com
Website:  http://www.gynecomastiasurgery.com
Website:  http://www.gynecomastianewyork.com/revi

Offline Paa_Paw

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Adjusting the hormone levels and attempting to realign your reproductive physiology is NOT a good Do-it-yourself project.  If this is not overseen by an Endocrinologist, it should not be done at all. 
Grandpa Dan

hammer

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Adjusting the hormone levels and attempting to realign your reproductive physiology is NOT a good Do-it-yourself project.  If this is not overseen by an Endocrinologist, it should not be done at all.

I agree totally, I was just talking about understanding it all!

hammer

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The endocrine system is intricate and balanced in our bodies.  Some men have naturally low testosterone levels and still have reasonable sexual function.  Others will need some gentle boost in their testosterone levels.  Older men generally see a slow decline in their testosterone, which is why older men sometimes develop gynecomastia (the testosterone to estrogen levels have flipped).

Testosterone treatment is best done under  very careful observation and monitoring of an endocrinologist.  Some general practitioners may cavalierly prescribe testosterone (injection, patches, etc) and not fully understand all the side effects which may occur, such as diminishing one's one natural production of testosterone, possible aromatization (change) of testosterone to estrogen, which in turn will stimulate breast development, etc.

One should not simply treat a number (the normal levels of testosterone run from 250 - 1100) -- so anything in-between can be considered normal.

I would very strongly caution anyone considering testosterone supplementation to undertake it with an endocrinologist supervising the treatment rather than buying medication on the internet and relying on advice given by non-physicians on the internet.  Further, anyone taking testosterone should consider taking an estrogen blocker as well.

Dr Jacobs

I agree totally Doc, in my comment I was talking about just understanding how it all works!

Offline clike

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I first noticed some growth in my left breast in late July of this year at 65 years old.  I was subsequently diagnosed with severe testosterone deficiency (about 160) and started TRT in September. I’m using topical solution applied to my underarms daily.  

My testosterone levels soared to above 900 after starting TRT.  I’m feeling better and my ED problems have subsided somewhat. I noticed that the breast growth on the left side has slowed some since going on TRT.  But, growth on the right side has started, whereas there had been no previous growth on that side prior to TRT.  

My boobs are still small enough to hide under most any shirt I wear, but they are quite noticeable bare chested.  But, I’m still wondering where things will go from here.  

I really did think that going on TRT would put an end to the breast growth, but after reading Walt’s post (he grew to a C cup while on TRT) and seeing some continued growth in my case, I’m not so sure anymore that TRT will solve that problem.  

Due to the other benefits I’m seeing with TRT, I will continue to use it.  If I experience any additional breast growth, I think I will just have to accept that as part of the deal. At my age, there are a lot worse problems I could be facing.
thanks for your input

Offline clike

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thank you all for your input. its really appreciated

Offline gynepaul

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The endocrine system is intricate and balanced in our bodies.  Some men have naturally low testosterone levels and still have reasonable sexual function.  Others will need some gentle boost in their testosterone levels.  Older men generally see a slow decline in their testosterone, which is why older men sometimes develop gynecomastia (the testosterone to estrogen levels have flipped).

Testosterone treatment is best done under  very careful observation and monitoring of an endocrinologist.  Some general practitioners may cavalierly prescribe testosterone (injection, patches, etc) and not fully understand all the side effects which may occur, such as diminishing one's one natural production of testosterone, possible aromatization (change) of testosterone to estrogen, which in turn will stimulate breast development, etc.

One should not simply treat a number (the normal levels of testosterone run from 250 - 1100) -- so anything in-between can be considered normal.

I would very strongly caution anyone considering testosterone supplementation to undertake it with an endocrinologist supervising the treatment rather than buying medication on the internet and relying on advice given by non-physicians on the internet.  Further, anyone taking testosterone should consider taking an estrogen blocker as well.

Dr Jacobs

I agree totally Doc, in my comment I was talking about just understanding how it all works!

That’s how I interpreted your comments, Hammer.  I’m a DIY guy for most things to the maximum extent that I can. But, I would never attempt to do DIY hormone treatments.  I’ll leave that to the docs. 

Just finished watching our young grandsons (toddlers) open their presents.  Fun stuff.  Merry Christmas to all of you!!

hammer

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Merry Christmas to all of you as well!

I have to admit that this is a very hard time of year for Debbie and I! 30 years ago my son Chris was killed in the sliding accident while with us on the 28th and afterwards I was estranged from my other two boys for 23 years! That and many other family dynamics come into play making many memories come up this time of year!

Not that I don't believe in the birth of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ as I have a very strong faith, just a hard time this time of year! But I wish you all a great day and a happy new year as well!

Bob

Offline MammaryMan

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Isn't FREE testosterone what really should be measured? Free testosterone is the active form of testosterone in my understanding. So (ignoring the proper units and exaggerated example), if one man has a T of 700 with a free T of 200 and his twin brother has a T of 200 and a free T of 200, they are both equivalent. The difference could be in each man's SHBG (Sex Hormone Binding Globulin) which binds to T and should be measured when T and free T are measured.

Offline clike

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Isn't FREE testosterone what really should be measured? Free testosterone is the active form of testosterone in my understanding. So (ignoring the proper units and exaggerated example), if one man has a T of 700 with a free T of 200 and his twin brother has a T of 200 and a free T of 200, they are both equivalent. The difference could be in each man's SHBG (Sex Hormone Binding Globulin) which binds to T and should be measured when T and free T are measured.
not sure where you going with this

 

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