Author Topic: andractim  (Read 3649 times)

Offline Nemmies

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Does andractim aka testosterone gel help cure gynecomastia?

Linkback: https://www.gynecomastia.org/forum/index.php?topic=22493.0

Offline Paa_Paw

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Not usually.

Testosterone, regardless of the route of administration, can actually make things worse in some cases.

If you have a surplus of Testosterone the body reacts by converting the surplus to Estrogen. This is essentially what happens to body builders who take steroids. Another thing that happens is that your normal secretions of Testosterone are decreased. Both of these actions would be to moderate the excess and both actions could actually cause Gynecomastia.

Attempting to adjust your own hormones without Comperent Medical supervision and monitoring is akin to playing Russian Roulette.
Grandpa Dan

DrBermant

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Does andractim aka testosterone gel help cure gynecomastia?

Not usually.

Testosterone, regardless of the route of administration, can actually make things worse in some cases.

If you have a surplus of Testosterone the body reacts by converting the surplus to Estrogen. This is essentially what happens to body builders who take steroids. Another thing that happens is that your normal secretions of Testosterone are decreased. Both of these actions would be to moderate the excess and both actions could actually cause Gynecomastia.

Attempting to adjust your own hormones without Comperent Medical supervision and monitoring is akin to playing Russian Roulette.

Pas Paw you are correct with the exception of the individual needing Testosterone such as in hypogonadism. For the man with low testosterone, depending on the mechanism, the body often over compensates trying to make enough of the hormone. In this effort too much estrogen can be made causing gynecomastia. In this case, replacing the missing testosterone can actually stop the over production of the breast forming hormones. I have seen quite a few patients stop their breast growth and stabilize once getting to normal levels of Testosterone.

Hope this helps,

Michael Bermant, M.D.
Board Certified
American Board of Plastic Surgery
Member: American Society of Plastic Surgeons and American Society of Aesthetic Plastic Surgeons
Specializing in Gynecomastia and Surgical Sculpture of the Male Chest
(804) 748-7737

Offline Paa_Paw

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Sorry if what I said was misleading. Obviously there are times when Testosterone is needed. My point was that the treatment needed competent Medical supervision and probably regular testing. Adjustment of the hormones is not a do-it-yourself job.

DrBermant

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Sorry if what I said was misleading. Obviously there are times when Testosterone is needed. My point was that the treatment needed competent Medical supervision and probably regular testing. Adjustment of the hormones is not a do-it-yourself job.

Oh so true!  Self medication can lead to disasters.

Michael Bermant, M.D.
Board Certified
American Board of Plastic Surgery
Member: American Society of Plastic Surgeons and American Society of Aesthetic Plastic Surgeons
Specializing in Gynecomastia and Surgical Sculpture of the Male Chest
(804) 748-7737

Offline Raider Fan

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Paa_Paw you are correct with the exception of the individual needing Testosterone such as in hypogonadism. For the man with low testosterone, depending on the mechanism, the body often over compensates trying to make enough of the hormone. In this effort too much estrogen can be made causing gynecomastia. In this case, replacing the missing testosterone can actually stop the over production of the breast forming hormones. I have seen quite a few patients stop their breast growth and stabilize once getting to normal levels of Testosterone.

Quite glad you wrote this, doctor.  Because I think this is exactly what happened in my case.  I am a middle aged man who had sudden (and painful) gynecomastia appear out of nowhere.  An endocrinologist found that I was slightly low on T.  It was such a slight deficiency that my total T showed to be in the low normal range, while my free T was just barely below the normal range. My primary care doctor didn't think I needed T replacement therapy, but in light of my symptoms, my endocrinologist thought I could benefit from taking a low dosage of the T gel.  He thought it could help stabilize my gyne, and hopefully, get rid of the pain.  I had been experiencing pain in my left breast for nearly 6 months and I was pretty much ready to try anything.  

After starting the T gel, it took less than a month for the pain to go away.  I really do believe that, in my case, it was responsible for HELPING my gyne stabilize.  It certainly hasn't made it worse. I do still have some increased tissue, which might not go away, but at least the condition has been calmed and I'm no longer in pain.  It was really starting to get me down.  

Another difference in what people typically believe about the T gel is that my doctor said I wouldn't "necessarily" HAVE to be on it long term.  A lot of people believe that once you start using it, you MUST be on it forever.  That might be true in some cases, but not ALL cases.  I think my doctor just wanted to try it to see if it would help me over a hump and get my hormone levels to be where they needed to be.  It appears to have worked.  I'll continue to get my T level measured and there is a possibility that I could stop using the gel at some point in time.  

I've lost nearly 20 pounds since this all started in an effort to assist my body in bringing my hormone levels back in line naturally.  I've still got several more pounds to shed before I'm where I want to be.  But every pound I lose "should" help my hormone levels (i.e, bring my T level up and my E level down).

Being overweight and middle aged was likely what knocked my hormone levels out of whack and caused my gyne.  So losing weight and exercising can increase the likelihood of my body naturally increasing T, while decreasing estrogen.  At least that's the way I understand it.  Please correct me if the way I'm phrasing it isn't correct.  

I'm thinking a lot of overweight, middle aged males may experience this and not be aware of it.  I think my slightly low T caused my hormone levels to get out of whack enough that I developed gyne.  But I'm sure there are many men who have the same situation that may NEVER develop gyne, and therefore, never know about their T deficiency.  The only reason I had my hormones checked was BECAUSE of my gyne.  I wasn't feeling badly and had no other symptoms of low T. 

So, ironically, my gyne was essentially an an alarm going off to tell me that I needed to lose weight and exercise a bit.  The body really is a wondrous thing.


DrBermant

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Paa_Paw you are correct with the exception of the individual needing Testosterone such as in hypogonadism. For the man with low testosterone, depending on the mechanism, the body often over compensates trying to make enough of the hormone. In this effort too much estrogen can be made causing gynecomastia. In this case, replacing the missing testosterone can actually stop the over production of the breast forming hormones. I have seen quite a few patients stop their breast growth and stabilize once getting to normal levels of Testosterone.

Quite glad you wrote this, doctor.  Because I think this is exactly what happened in my case.  I am a middle aged man who had sudden (and painful) gynecomastia appear out of nowhere.  An endocrinologist found that I was slightly low on T.  It was such a slight deficiency that my total T showed to be in the low normal range, while my free T was just barely below the normal range. My primary care doctor didn't think I needed T replacement therapy, but in light of my symptoms, my endocrinologist thought I could benefit from taking a low dosage of the T gel.  He thought it could help stabilize my gyne, and hopefully, get rid of the pain.  I had been experiencing pain in my left breast for nearly 6 months and I was pretty much ready to try anything.  

After starting the T gel, it took less than a month for the pain to go away.  I really do believe that, in my case, it was responsible for HELPING my gyne stabilize.  It certainly hasn't made it worse. I do still have some increased tissue, which might not go away, but at least the condition has been calmed and I'm no longer in pain.  It was really starting to get me down.  

Another difference in what people typically believe about the T gel is that my doctor said I wouldn't "necessarily" HAVE to be on it long term.  A lot of people believe that once you start using it, you MUST be on it forever.  That might be true in some cases, but not ALL cases.  I think my doctor just wanted to try it to see if it would help me over a hump and get my hormone levels to be where they needed to be.  It appears to have worked.  I'll continue to get my T level measured and there is a possibility that I could stop using the gel at some point in time.  

I've lost nearly 20 pounds since this all started in an effort to assist my body in bringing my hormone levels back in line naturally.  I've still got several more pounds to shed before I'm where I want to be.  But every pound I lose "should" help my hormone levels (i.e, bring my T level up and my E level down).

Being overweight and middle aged was likely what knocked my hormone levels out of whack and caused my gyne.  So losing weight and exercising can increase the likelihood of my body naturally increasing T, while decreasing estrogen.  At least that's the way I understand it.  Please correct me if the way I'm phrasing it isn't correct.  

I'm thinking a lot of overweight, middle aged males may experience this and not be aware of it.  I think my slightly low T caused my hormone levels to get out of whack enough that I developed gyne.  But I'm sure there are many men who have the same situation that may NEVER develop gyne, and therefore, never know about their T deficiency.  The only reason I had my hormones checked was BECAUSE of my gyne.  I wasn't feeling badly and had no other symptoms of low T. 

So, ironically, my gyne was essentially an an alarm going off to tell me that I needed to lose weight and exercise a bit.  The body really is a wondrous thing.



This is why it is essential for an experienced Endocrinologist be the one to determine if Testosterone is needed. Supplement a diminished amount, it can help. Add when not needed at the excess can make the gynecomastia worse among a myriad of other issues. Adding the Testosterone is a 2 edge sword. Extra hormone tends to shut down the body's own production. Extended use means that withdrawing the hormone results in too little as the body does not have the resources to supply the needed levels. Short term use for a transient hormone condition can sometimes result in being able to stop once that temporary condition stopped. But then the body does need to be able to kick back in to provide levels. Again a tricky issue best left to that Endocrinologist.

Hope this helps,

Michael Bermant, M.D.
Board Certified
American Board of Plastic Surgery
Member: American Society of Plastic Surgeons and American Society of Aesthetic Plastic Surgeons
Specializing in Gynecomastia and Surgical Sculpture of the Male Chest
(804) 748-7737

Offline nibbbble

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Does andractim aka testosterone gel help cure gynecomastia?

I'm not an expert with this, but Andractim is not exactly a testosterone gel. It's a topical DHT aka. dihydrotestosterone gel.
DHT doesn't aromatize and doesn't convert to estrogen.

An endocrinologist prescribed me some Andractim to get rid of my gyno, which compared to some pictures I've seen here isn't the most serious type.
I don't believe it's going to work but I will give it time and hope the best! (I've been using it only a few days now.)

After some research I believe Andractim can be effective on gynecomastia which one hasn't had for a long time yet. I think that if one's gyno has just appeared, it could disappear with it. In my case, it is gyno from puberty which many others have as well. I don't think it's gonna help as I've had it for so long.

Offline Paa_Paw

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The point which I would reiterate is that the adjustment of hormone levels is not a job for anyone who is not qualified and has access to a reliable lab.

This is a case where it could be truly said that one mans serum is another mans poison.


 

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