Author Topic: Post op concerns  (Read 1640 times)

Offline PlainDave

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Hello, I'm 6 weeks post op. I under went an excision with lypo. I had a mild case, so I thought it would be no problem. I have pain around the areolas from the scar tissue. I hope this subsides, but it is quite persistent. How long should this pain last?? I also noticed that the surgery seemed to only reduce my condition by about 25% visually. I broke the bank for this surgery and it only looks slightly better. I'll post before and after pics later, but I hope there is still healing and shrinking to go.

Linkback: https://www.gynecomastia.org/forum/index.php?topic=22746.0

Offline Dr. Elliot Jacobs

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You are still in the very active phase of healing -- and some of what you are observing may be either swelling or perhaps early scar tissue.

It would be best to voice your concerns to your surgeon, who after all knows exactly what was done.

You still have many months of healing to go -- and your chest will change over that time.

Be patient but communicate with your surgeon.

Dr Jacobs
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Certified: American Board of Plastic Surgery
Fellow: American College of Surgeons
Practice sub-specialty in Gynecomastia Surgery
815 Park Avenue
New York, New York 10021
Telephone:  (212) 570-6080
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Website:  http://www.gynecomastiasurgery.com
Website:  http://www.gynecomastianewyork.com/revi

Offline PlainDave

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Thanks a lot for the response. I will ask him today if he took out the whole gland or left some behind. If you notice the early after pictures, it was ideal, flat with little scarring. Now, in the recent after pictures, the scars are much more visible and the nipples are beginning to protrude again. If the areolas return to their normal state, then I know for sure it is hormonal, but my surgeon suggested it wasn't.

Offline PlainDave

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I have another question Dr. Can the gland grow back once it is removed? It looks like it is actually growning back, and that may be in fact what the pain is, instead of scar tissue?

Offline Dr. Elliot Jacobs

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Rapid re-growth of breast tissue is virtually unheard of.  Rather, it is most likely scar tissue perhaps mixed with some residual swelling.

Massage may or may not be useful for you -- you should inquire of your surgeon.

Six weeks is quite early in the healing process.  Relax and be patient.  It will take many months for everything to settle down -- and all your worrying may be for naught -- except for a few gray hairs that you will have gained in the process.

Dr Jacobs

Offline Litlriki

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As per Dr. Jacobs, it is very common to have swelling in the tissue early on after surgery, and this swelling can be significant, especially if the initial case was mild.  Also, sometimes early on, while you're wearing compression, the swelling is less obvious, but when the garment is discontinued, it may puff up a little more.  What you're describing isn't all that unusual. 

In fact, I try to prepare my steroid-using patients for this observation, since some of them will decide to continue use in spite of having developed gynecomastia and undergoing surgical correction. They may notice such swelling coincident with resumption of anabolic steroid use.  These tend to be patients who are truly committed to the "steroid lifestyle," who may be competitive bodybuilders, powerlifters, MMA fighters, etc. They understand that a small amount of "gland" is left behind, and it might be stimulated with recurrent steroid use.  Alternatively, and more likely in the early stages of healing, the fullness they may feel is usually related to swelling, as opposed to recurrence.  As Dr. Jacobs has suggested--patience is the name of the game at this point.

Good luck,

Rick Silverman 
Dr. Silverman, M.D.
Cosmetic and Reconstructive Plastic Surgery
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Newton, MA 02458
617-965-9500
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www.ricksilverman.com
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