Author Topic: Creating a bra for men.  (Read 8780 times)

Offline chestyoldman

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I hope this comment isn't too late.  A problem I have experienced as I have shopped for bras is that, while my measurements calculate to be 46B, I cannot fill most bra cups in that size.  I just do not project enough.  Consequently, I have to search smaller band and cup sizes and use an extender.  I do not know whether or not this is typical of other men.

Offline TigerPaws

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I hope this comment isn't too late.  A problem I have experienced as I have shopped for bras is that, while my measurements calculate to be 46B, I cannot fill most bra cups in that size.  I just do not project enough.  Consequently, I have to search smaller band and cup sizes and use an extender.  I do not know whether or not this is typical of other men.
Normal even for women, extenders makes a bra with smaller cups fit our wider chests.

Offline Bman41

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I think the big things for me:
1.  Most custom bras or niche bras are super expensive, big turn off for purchasing one.  Women's bras are made in far more mass production, have all the design issues worked out, but are not necessarily ideal fit for men with gyne.  If you can't bring it to market in a reasonable price, say $35 or less, sales will be dismal and probably end up losing $ on the venture.  Hate to see that.  I see sooo many companies come out with a great product but price themselves out of business.  Get the price down and they won't be able to make enough, price it too high and they sit on the shelf and never sell hardly any.  (OnStar is a great example, good service, but with a re-up rate of <20%, they are killing themselves, considering the 1st year is usually free, and only 20% re-up after that, they have an awful business model)
2.  Sports bras tend to make a uniboob look, which isn't realistic.  If one has breasts that are of much size at all, they are seen no matter what, so generally a minimizer style is likely best.  
3.  I have enough problems with fat under my arms, I really want something that will keep that under control somehow.  
I don't like extenders, they often itch and then the straps are in the wrong position and the straps fall off the shoulders too easy.
Not a fan of racer back because the straps end up easily being seen, so for me a std bra design if preferred.  Not saying racer back isn't comfortable, they are, but just easily seen.  Maybe a convertible style would be better, so one could choose.  And not pull over.  Ever pull over a bra when just out of the shower?  Very much a pain.  Need band clasps and adjustability.

Offline note235

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Thanks. All this is helpful.

Offline chifer

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I've read this thread with much interest and I am really excited that you are working with your team on something so specific. Although I never considered wearing bras myself, ...
  • I have 10 years of experience with compression garments and took an active part in having a compression top designed for transsexual women before their breast reduction adjusted to better suit me as a man (since I think I am a bit more blunt).
  • I have a deep understanding of bras, their sizes and fittings. My wife has a very particular size (large cup, small bust) that requires some "searching", and only at better lingerie stores. The employees are usually positively astounded (one offered me a job on the spot, and she wasn't kidding) while female customers are simply bewildered.

I concur with what other posters have said above. The breasts being placed further apart and the fatty tissue on the sides require a wider and sturdy band on the sides to provide more support to prevent the bra from either cutting into the flesh or causing an unwanted "Michelin man" type of curve of fat under the shoulder (or "sideboobs under cloth" if you will).

The one thing that I am missing in the above discussion though (and this was my other main point when having my compression top customized) is: you are designing this bra for men; the side of humanity that is blunt by definition when compared to the female side. A bra designed for the gentle touch of a woman might not last long. We drag, we rip, we tear, we exert force. So any seam should be made wider, the fabric will likely need to be thicker, and straps should be durable. And yet, the fabric should breathe as we do also have a different skin type that in the long run doesn't respond well to continuously being covered.

What I don't know is what most men who do wear bras would be looking for in a bra, and I don't really get the answer from this thread. I would be interested how many simply want them to stay put (including preventing them from bouncing), or whether others would prefer to accentuate them to look more graceful (rather than those typical "slanted lines" appearing when wearing a T-shirt), without the chest looking like a "uniboob" as someone described it above. That may be an important thing to find out (and to perhaps even provide different bra models for).


 

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