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Author Topic: 22 Y.O athletic male Bilateral GYNO surgery/ General Surgeon    (Read 7464 times)
wrestletib
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« on: October 01, 2011, 01:41:22 PM »

I just had my surgery for bilateral gyno done by a general surgeon (insurance paid)

I mentioned to him about wearing a compression vest right before I was put completely under general anesthesia... and he told me (its not really needed... you have enough muscle that it will simply be drained if fluid builds up , etc etc..... well, after I woke up I was bandaged ....rested for a few hours and went to work for the night (3rd shift sleep tech) ... pain felt like I was very sore from a chest workout...but the vicodin that was wearing off was making me feel sick.

well, After work I went to sleep....6-7 hours later I woke up and thought...hmm, i really think my doctor has it wrong, YOU NEED A VEST. So I googled and called my uncle (physician) and he got me a compression wrap (for now) ....seems like a foot wide stretchy wrap thats wrapped around my torso.

my questions for you guys who wore the vest:

1.) how tight was it?
2.) did you even wear a vest?.. drain fluids later?
3.) how long did you wear a vest or have fluid taken out
4.) did i just ruin it all by not wearing a compression vest IMMEDIATELY after surgery? (it took nearly 20 hours before I wore the compression wrap)

Im hoping for the best... My gyno was not highly visable b/c the way the muscle/fat was proportioned...but I indeed had a rather large mass originally (more so unilateral) but no puffy nipple, it bothered me, but no one knew about it.... Ill cry if I unwrap the bandages and i have inverted/weird nipples ...



edit:

my body looks like ****, I haven't dieted/lifted in months...




after surgery I awoke to wearing these bandages ... which feel like they are kinda compressing the wounds.




and now I am wearing this after calling my uncle saying " dude, i need a vest! asap "


 I don't know how tight I should wrap it


i am interested in buying a vest to wear, I was linked to this by a poster over at bodybuilding.com
its a stage 1 adjustable vest, costs $99

what about stage 2?

************UPDATED PICS, SCROLL DOWN
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morpheus11
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« Reply #1 on: October 02, 2011, 11:05:46 AM »

I'm not qualified to speak on the issue, but why not wear a vest anyway for the next few weeks.  If not that, then maybe a gynecomastia compression shirt?  Check of GC2 compression tank.  If you end up ordering, order a size smaller, and that might work in place of a vest.  I've been wearing their compression shirts for the past 4 years, and even after I have my surgery, November 1st, I think I'll be wearing them for a few more months just to be sure everything works out. 

Anyhow, that's my two cents.  Also, just thought I'd reply so this post gets more action.  It would be very comforting if those who have had the surgery chimed in. 

Good luck!
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wrestletib
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« Reply #2 on: October 02, 2011, 07:43:26 PM »

I'm not qualified to speak on the issue, but why not wear a vest anyway for the next few weeks.  If not that, then maybe a gynecomastia compression shirt?  Check of GC2 compression tank.  If you end up ordering, order a size smaller, and that might work in place of a vest.  I've been wearing their compression shirts for the past 4 years, and even after I have my surgery, November 1st, I think I'll be wearing them for a few more months just to be sure everything works out. 

Anyhow, that's my two cents.  Also, just thought I'd reply so this post gets more action.  It would be very comforting if those who have had the surgery chimed in. 

Good luck!

thanks for the advice, I appreciate it
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wrestletib
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« Reply #3 on: October 02, 2011, 07:43:42 PM »

well, I took the bandages off to inspect the wounds (its been 48 hours) and I am quite satisfied with the results. I am aware that the first month, its going to look ugly.

The approach my surgeon took was making a 1" incision underneath the nipple..the left has a larger cut, about 1.5 (more gyno to pull out)


I sure hope with time and proper care I can minimize scarring with topical creams....
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wrestletib
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« Reply #4 on: October 04, 2011, 01:54:46 PM »

Here are one of the cuts.... people give me your input (day 4 post OP)

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Dr. George Pope
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« Reply #5 on: October 04, 2011, 05:23:56 PM »

I don't mean to be critical, because it looks like you're going to get a nice result.  BUT, look at the incision that your general surgeon made: a horizontal cut under the nipple/areola complex.  Why not make a circular cut ON the nipple/areola complex so that you don't have a visible scar?  THAT, to all of you guys who frequent this site, is why IMO you should select a PLASTIC surgeon for this operation.

George Pope, MD
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George H Pope, MD, FACS
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Orlando Plastic Surgery Center
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wrestletib
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« Reply #6 on: October 04, 2011, 07:01:15 PM »

thank you for your input and I completely agree!
before doing the surgery, I asked him things like... "are you going to leave a little of the gyno in? that way it will prevent the areola complex from collapsing?" and "where will the cut be?"

when he told me two small cuts underneath the nipple, i figured a semi circular cut... like in the youtube videos done by plastic surgeons.

To be honest....I am a little sad...b/c I really did not need the surgery. Yeah I had mass behind the nipple, but it didn't affect my life,nor was it noticible to the naked eye.... it was just tender to the touch. The fact that My physician was able to get the insurance to cover it made me want to go ahead and get it removed once and for all.

anywho, im not complaining  Undecided ... at least there appears to be no issues with the actual nipple looking deformed.
What is done is done...

Im going to do my best to find topical creams to minimize scarring... at worst there's always laser therapy for scar removal??

here is a pic days before the surgery... the left pec had a fairly large sized glandular mass, that wasnt noticible due to the pectoral muscles/fat proportioned well. I also had some galactorrhea from the left pec where the gyno was larger (hormonal panel came back normal)





the slice/sutures look very thin.... hoping for the best..
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wrestletib
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« Reply #7 on: October 04, 2011, 09:05:27 PM »

Dr. Pope, or anyone for the matter


feeling my pec.... it feels very watery...jiggly even... this is the fluid no?

Ive been wearing a compression wrap 24/7 (seen in pics above) rather snug, borderline tight. Is this normal? I know theres suppose to be fluid build up, but how exactly does it go away?.... The vests/wraps help compressing the space/gap created by the gyno removal.... which is what im doing.

does the body eventually absorb this fluid? or does it get drained? Also, do you recommend massaging? how?

thanks for all the help guys


edit: I have a follow up appointment with the surgeon who did the surgery next week. I think he mentioned something about possibly draining the site, although I am not sure. I would like advice if there is any to be given

*how does one know when all liquid was successfully removed? guessing?
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Dr. George Pope
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« Reply #8 on: October 05, 2011, 06:49:40 AM »

You pretty much look at the contour of the tissue and feel for fluid.  There can be a pocket of fluid (serum or blood) that in theory can be drained, or more commonly, the tissue is saturated with fluid the way a sponge is.  That fluid needs to go away on its own - the body will resorb it.

Be sure to stay in contact with your surgeon about this, and keep all appointments.  He'll be able to handle whatever is there.
And try not to worry about the scars.  You have light skin, and light-skinned people tend to scar better than darker-skinned people.  The caveat is, you cannot let the scars get sunburned, or they'll stay noticeable.  Be sure to wear a sunblock on the scars whenever they are exposed.  Mederma scar cream is good for scars and can be purchased at Walgreen's or CVS.  There are other over the counter scar preparations out there too.

George Pope, MD
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George H Pope, MD, FACS
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Orlando Plastic Surgery Center
www.orlandoplasticsurgerycenter.com
Phone: 407-857-6261
wrestletib
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« Reply #9 on: October 05, 2011, 01:23:34 PM »

You pretty much look at the contour of the tissue and feel for fluid.  There can be a pocket of fluid (serum or blood) that in theory can be drained, or more commonly, the tissue is saturated with fluid the way a sponge is.  That fluid needs to go away on its own - the body will resorb it.

Be sure to stay in contact with your surgeon about this, and keep all appointments.  He'll be able to handle whatever is there.
And try not to worry about the scars.  You have light skin, and light-skinned people tend to scar better than darker-skinned people.  The caveat is, you cannot let the scars get sunburned, or they'll stay noticeable.  Be sure to wear a sunblock on the scars whenever they are exposed.  Mederma scar cream is good for scars and can be purchased at Walgreen's or CVS.  There are other over the counter scar preparations out there too.

George Pope, MD

thank you for your time and speedy response to my questions
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wrestletib
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« Reply #10 on: October 08, 2011, 08:38:37 PM »

.....okay, im feelining extremely scared and nervous....

I took my compression vest off, for a minute to inspect the healing, and i still notice a bit of squishy liquid where the gyno was. (no big deal I thought, it'll be drained or go away with time) at least i couldnt see any deformity...

then ....carefully feeling the perimeter of the location where the glandular mass once was, I feel a "crater"....  im freaking out.

maybe its bruising,liquids, etc.... but I am fairly certain I feel a definite "hole" when I trace my finger from the top of my Pectoral muscle to the nipple.


Sad .... I wish i never inspected it , ill go mad waiting for it to heal to fully be able to judge whats wrong.
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Dr. George Pope
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« Reply #11 on: October 09, 2011, 03:55:21 AM »

Try your best not to worry about it.  Many guys scrutinize their results way too early.  Keep your vest on as directed, and if your surgeon has instructed you to massage your chest, do so as he's instructed you.  Be patient - your tissue has to heal, and you're probably jumping to the wrong conclusion.

George Pope, MD
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George H Pope, MD, FACS
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Orlando Plastic Surgery Center
www.orlandoplasticsurgerycenter.com
Phone: 407-857-6261
wrestletib
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« Reply #12 on: October 20, 2011, 08:02:24 AM »

here the stitches are dissolving....




however.... i went to see the surgeon today and he asked if I wanted to drain my left pec....i said, sure why not.

this is the result.... (mildly flexing)



I dont know how to feel (very nervous..depressed..).... he told me with time it will get better, some depression may still be present, but the outlook is good. (I am like 19-20 days post op)

I will be putting on some mass, since I am returning to weight lifting, and I was wondering... will any added mass to my chest help with this crater?

and how is it even there? Removed too much of the glandular mass?  .... i still dont understand how a crater is formed if supposedly the mass is planted on top of the pec muscle


should i even resume wearing the compression vest?  Embarrassed
massage techniques? try them?
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wrestletib
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« Reply #13 on: October 21, 2011, 03:41:06 PM »




just woke up took a shower/removed the compression vest, and snapped this pic. It seems some fluid/scar tissue is blending with the crater...obviously still noticable. Maybe with some time and what not, the bruising/swelling goes down some more
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wrestletib
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« Reply #14 on: February 07, 2012, 08:59:25 PM »

UPDATE:

**I've been working out a lot, I stopped wearing my compression vest about 5-6 weeks post surgery ( i just couldnt tolerate it anymore )

**I have been  using Mederma...though not as recommened. I simply apply it whenever I remember.

**The crater has been filled with scar tissue, and not really bothersome anymore.

**The scars are pretty ugly hypertrophic scars. I am hoping they go away in time....

here are some pics as of a few days ago.





I wont be getting corrective surgery. I don't think there is much to fix. The only thing now is to fix these scars.
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